Guidelines For How To Write An Article Critique

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how to write an article critique? what is?An article critique is a detailed analysis and evaluation of an article or research paper. The main purpose of writing an article critique is to provide the readers with a better understanding of the article, as well as its implications.

When writing an article critique, it is important to keep in mind that the goal is not simply to criticize the work but to provide a well-reasoned and well-supported analysis of the article.

There are a few things to keep in mind when writing an article critique:

  • Read the article carefully and make sure you understand it.
  • Identify the main thesis or argument of the article.
  • Evaluate the evidence and arguments presented in the article.
  • Critique the article’s strengths and weaknesses.
  • Develop your argument or interpretation of the article.
  • Support your argument or interpretation with evidence from the article.
  • Conclude your critique by summarizing your main points and providing your assessment of the article.
how to write an article critique

Article Critique Format

When writing an article critique, there is a specific format that should be followed. The format includes the following sections:

  • Introduction
  • Summary of the article
  • Evaluation of the article
  • Conclusion

Introduction

The introduction should provide a brief overview of the article and its main points. It should also include a statement of your evaluation or interpretation of the article.

Summary of the Article

The summary should give a brief overview of the content of the article. It should include a description of the article’s main points, arguments, and evidence.

Evaluation of the Article

In this section, you will evaluate the article’s strengths and weaknesses. You should also discuss how well the author supports their arguments and whether or not they have adequately addressed counterarguments.

Conclusion

The conclusion should briefly summarize your main points and provide your overall assessment of the article.

Reference List

After the conclusion, you should include a reference list of all the sources you used in your critique.

Article Critique Example

Here is an example of an article critique:

Smith, J. (2017). How to write an article critique. Journal of Business Research, 70(2), pp. 456-462.

The above article provides a detailed and helpful guide on how to write an article critique. The author discusses the main points that should be included in an article critique, as well as the format that should be followed. The article also includes a helpful example of an article critique.

The article is well-written and provides a helpful overview of the topic. However, the author could have included more information on how to evaluate the strength of an argument and counterarguments.

Overall, the article is helpful and provides a good starting point for those who are not sure how to write an article critique.

Reference:

Smith, J. (2017). How to write an article critique. Journal of Business Research, 70(2), pp. 456-462.

What is an article critique

An article critique is a detailed analysis of an article or piece of writing. It typically includes an evaluation of the author’s argument, structure, and style, as well as a close reading of the text itself.

To write a successful article critique, you must first read the piece carefully and take thorough notes. Once you have a good understanding of the author’s argument, you can begin to assess its strengths and weaknesses.

In addition, pay close attention to the way the author has organized their thoughts and expressed their ideas. This will give you a better sense of whether or not the piece is well-written and effective. With all of this in mind, you should be able to write a thoughtful and insightful critique of any article or piece of writing.

Why Critique Articles?

As a marketer, I’m often asked to read and critique articles before they’re published. And I’ve come to realize that there are three good reasons to do this:

  • It allows me to provide feedback from a reader’s perspective. I can point out areas where the article might be confusing or unclear and suggest ways to make it more readable.
  • It gives me a chance to offer my insights and perspectives on the topic. In many cases, I can add value by sharing my own experiences or sharing new data or research that might be relevant.
  • And perhaps most importantly, critiquing articles helps me to build relationships with the authors.

The structure of an article critique

There are all sorts of ways to criticize an article. You could tear it apart for its lack of logic, or you could point out how it’s biased and factually inaccurate. Or you could simply say that it’s not very well-written.

But if you want to give a truly useful critique, you need to do more than just point out the article’s flaws. You need to provide a detailed analysis of how and why the article doesn’t work.

That might sound like a lot of work, but it doesn’t have to be. There’s a simple structure that you can use to critique any article:

  • Start with a summary of the article.
  • Then, identify the main argument or thesis of the piece.
  • Point out any flaws in the reasoning or evidence that the author uses to support their argument.
  • Explain how the article could be improved.

Writing the introduction to your critique

The goal of your introduction is to get the reader’s attention and give them some context for the rest of your paper. To do this, you need to hook their attention and give them a sense of what your paper will be about. There are a few different ways to do this, but one common approach is to start with a broad statement and then narrow in on your specific topic.

For example, you might start with a general statement about the importance of critiquing art, and then narrow in on your specific purpose for writing about the painting you’re critiquing. Another approach is to start with a strong quotation from the piece you’re critiquing.

This can be an effective way to pique the reader’s interest and set the stage for your paper. Whichever approach you choose, make sure that your introduction is engaging and provides some context for the rest of your paper.

Writing the body of your critique

The body of your critique is where you get to dive in and show off your analytical skills. This is the section where you’ll be making the strongest arguments, so it’s important to take your time and get it right. Begin by carefully reading the work you’re critiquing, and taking detailed notes.

As you read, consider the following questions: What is the author’s main point? What evidence does the author use to support their argument? How effective is that evidence? Are there any holes in the argument? Once you’ve finished reading, take some time to brainstorm your thoughts on the piece. What did you like about it?

What didn’t you like? How could it be improved? Once you have a good sense of your views, you can start writing your critique. Remember to focus on giving constructive feedback that will help the author improve their work. And with that, you’re ready to start writing!

Summarizing and concluding your critique

The downside of the internet is that it’s full of people who are paid to have opinions. This, in turn, means that we’re often asked to wade through a lot of noise to find the signal. When it comes to critiquing someone’s work, it’s important to be clear, concise, and helpful. Here are a few tips:

  • Start by summarizing what you liked about the work. This will help the author know that you were paying attention, and it will also give them a good starting point for revision.
  • Point out any areas where you think the work could be improved. Be specific, and offer suggestions for how the author could make the changes you suggest.
  • Conclude with a positive statement about the work as a whole. This will help the author feel good about their work, even if it still needs some revision.

Sample critiques

A critique is a detailed analysis and assessment of something, typically art, literature, or music. A good critique should be both objective and subjective, offering both a positive and negative evaluation of the work in question.

However, all too often, people focus only on the negatives, offering little in the way of constructive feedback. This is a shame, as a well-rounded critique can be an invaluable tool for helping an artist improve their work.

When critiquing someone’s work, it is important to start by highlighting the positives. Not only will this help to build rapport with the artist, but it will also ensure that your criticisms are taken seriously. After all, if you only focus on the negatives, the artist may feel that you are not appreciating their work.

Once you have identified the positives, you can then move on to identifying areas for improvement. Again, it is important to be both objective and subjective here, offering specific examples of where you believe the work could be improved.

And always end on a positive note, offering suggestions for how the artist could make further improvements in the future. By taking this approach, you can ensure that your critiques are both helpful and encouraging.

Checklist for writing a critique

The checklist for writing a critique is pretty simple: say what you liked, what you didn’t like, and why. It’s hard to do all three in a short blog post or even in a long one, so if you’re ever stuck, just pick one. 

The best critiques are specific. “I loved the way the author used short sentences to create a sense of urgency” is more helpful than “I loved it.” 

The best critiques also include at least a little bit of an explanation of why you did or didn’t like something. “The author’s choice of words made me feel uncomfortable” is more helpful than “I didn’t like it.” 

And finally, the best critiques come from a place of generosity. If you can’t find anything nice to say, maybe this isn’t the right book for you. But if you can find something to praise, your readers will appreciate it.

Tips for Writing a Good Critique

When you’re critiquing someone’s work, your goal should be to help them make it better. But sometimes, it can be hard to give constructive criticism without coming across as negative or judgmental. Here are a few tips to keep in mind the next time you’re writing a critique:

  • Be specific: Vague comments like “I didn’t like it” or “It needs work” aren’t helpful. Instead, try to identify specific things that you didn’t like or that you think could be improved.
  • Avoid personal attacks: It’s important to critique the work, not the person. Stick to the facts and resist the temptation to get personal.
  • Be respectful: Even if you disagree with the author’s point of view, you can still respectfully express your opinion.
  • Offer suggestions: If you have ideas for how the author could improve their work, be sure to share them! Just be sure to phrase them as suggestions, not demands.
  • Critique the work, not the idea: It’s possible to disagree with an idea while still thinking that it’s well-expressed in a particular piece of writing. When critiquing a work, focus on the execution, not the idea.

Now that you know how to write a critique, put your skills to the test with one of these sample critiques:

person using laptop computer

Sample Critique 1

I loved the way the author used short sentences to create a sense of urgency. I also thought the choice of words was effective in conveying the characters’ emotions. However, I didn’t like how the story jumped around chronologically. I think it would have been more effective if it had been told linearly.

Sample Critique 2

The author’s choice of words made me feel uncomfortable. I felt like they were trying too hard to be poetic and it came across as forced. Additionally, I didn’t like how the author jumped around chronologically. I think it would have been more effective if it had been told linearly.

Sample Critique 3

I thought the story was well-written and engaging. I especially liked the way the author used short sentences to create a sense of urgency. However, I didn’t like how the story jumped around chronologically. I think it would have been more effective if it had been told linearly.

Article critique examples

When you’re looking at article critique examples, it’s helpful to keep in mind the different elements that go into a strong critique. The first thing to look for is a clear and concise summary of the article. This should include the main points of the article, as well as the author’s thesis statement.

Next, you’ll want to assess the argument that the author makes. Is it well-reasoned and supported by evidence? Are there any weak points in the logic? Finally, you’ll want to consider your reaction to the article. Do you agree with the author’s perspective?

Are there any areas where you would like to see more clarification or development? By taking all of these factors into account, you can get a well-rounded sense of what makes a good article critique example.

Conclusion

When critiquing an article, it’s important to be specific and identify the good and bad points. It’s also important to be respectful and offer suggestions on how the author could improve their work. By following these tips, you can learn how to write a critique that is helpful for both the writer and the reader.

FAQs

What is an article critique?

An article critique is a critical evaluation of an article. It includes an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the article and a judgment of its overall value.

How do I start writing one?

Before you begin writing your critique, it is important to read the article carefully and take note of its main arguments. Once you have a good understanding of the article’s content, you can start writing your critique.

What are some things to keep in mind while writing an article critique?

Some things to keep in mind while writing an article critique include: identifying the main arguments of the article, evaluating the strength of those arguments, and providing your judgment about the overall value of the article.

What is the difference between an article critique and a review?

An article critique is a critical evaluation of an article, while a review is simply a summary of an article. A review may provide a critical evaluation, but it is not as in-depth as an article critique.

How long should an article critique be?

An article critique can be as long or as short as you need it to be. However, it is important to make sure that you cover all of the main points of the article and provide a thorough evaluation.

What are some common mistakes made when writing an article critique?

Some common mistakes made when writing an article critique include: forgetting to proofread, not providing enough detail, and not being critical enough.

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