Imperative Sentences: Defined, with Examples

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As a professional, you know the power of a well-crafted sentence. But are you familiar with Imperative sentences? Also known as commanding sentences, they have a unique structure and purpose which make them perfect for delivering instructions, or getting your point across forcefully. In this post, we’ll define Imperative sentences, and look at some examples. Then we’ll explore how to use them effectively in your writing. Let’s get started!

demt1mgslj0 edited Ranking Articles Imperative Sentences: Defined, with Examples

What are Imperative Sentences?

An imperative sentence gives a command or makes a request. The tone of voice is often commanding, assertive, or urgent. It usually starts with a verb in the present tense, followed by a noun or pronoun. For example: “Stand up straight.” “Close the door, please.” “Come here now.”

Imperative sentences are often seen as bossy or rude. However, they can also be polite requests. For example, “Please pass the salt.”

Imperative sentences often don’t have a subject because it is understood that the speaker is instructing the listener. However, we can add a subject to make the sentence sound more polite. For example, “Can you please close the door?”

We can also use imperative sentences to give ourselves commands or reminders. For example, “Remember to take your keys with you.”

If you want to sound more assertive, use an imperative sentence without adding a subject. If you want to sound more polite, add a subject.

What is the difference between an Imperative sentence and a declarative sentence?

The best way to think about the difference between an imperative sentence and a declarative sentence is this: An imperative sentence is a command, while a declarative sentence is a statement.

Imperative sentences always take the form of “You+Verb,” as in “You sit down.” Declarative sentences, on the other hand, make statements and can take any form. For example, “The sun is rising” is a declarative sentence.

The key difference between the two lies in their function. Imperative sentences are used to give orders or instructions, while declarative sentences are simply used to state facts or share information. In other words, an imperative sentence tells you what to do, while a declarative sentence simply tells you something.

How to Use Imperative Sentences

Now that we’ve covered the basics of Imperative sentences, let’s take a look at how to use them effectively.

1. Keep it simple

When you’re giving someone an instruction, keep your sentence short and to the point. The goal is to make it as easy as possible for the person to understand and follow your instruction. For example, “Turn left at the next corner.”

2. Be clear

Make sure your imperative sentence is unambiguous. Otherwise, the person you’re speaking to may not understand what you want them to do. For example, “Can you please turn down the music?” is clear. “Can you please turn the music down?” is not as clear and could be interpreted in different ways.

3. Be specific

If you want someone to do something, be as specific as possible about what you want them to do. For example, “Please close the door.” is more specific than “Can you please shut the door?”

4. Use strong verbs

When you’re giving an instruction, use a verb that is clear and concise. For example, “Walk” is better than “proceed.” “Turn” is better than “rotate.”

5. Be polite

If you want to sound more polite, add a subject to your imperative sentence. For example, “Can you please close the door?”

6. Avoid using too many imperative sentences

If you use too many Imperative sentences, your listener may feel like they are being bossed around. So use them sparingly and only when necessary.

7. Use affirmative rather than negative commands

It’s generally better to use affirmative commands (e.g., “Sit down”) rather than negative commands (e.g., “Don’t stand up”). Negative commands can be confusing and are often ignored.

8. Use the imperative mood sparingly

The imperative mood is best used for giving instructions or orders. It should not be used for making requests or asking questions. For example, “Please pass the salt.” is a request, not an instruction. “What is your name?” is a question, not an order.

9. Be careful with commands that can’t be undone

Some commands, such as “Delete all the files on your computer,” can’t be undone. So be careful with these types of commands and make sure you really want the person to do what you’re asking them to do.

10. Be aware of cultural differences

In some cultures, it’s considered rude to use the imperative mood. In others, it’s perfectly acceptable. So be aware of these differences and adjust your use of the imperative mood accordingly.

When it comes to Imperative sentences, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, keep your sentence short and to the point. Second, be clear and specific about what you want the person to do. And third, use strong verbs that are unambiguous. Finally, remember

How to form an Imperative sentence

An imperative sentence gives a command. It’s often used as the basis for a marketing campaign or slogan, telling customers what to do: “Just Do It.”

The best imperatives are short, clear and direct. They make a promise and then deliver on that promise. Here are three great examples:

  • “Buy Now!” This imperative is straight to the point, telling customers that they need to take action right away.
  • “Get Your Free Gift!” This sentence is a bit more complex, but it still delivers a clear message: if you take action now, you’ll get something valuable for free.
  • “Sign Up Now!” This imperative urges customers to sign up for something, whether it’s a newsletter, email list or other offer. By doing so, they’ll get access to exclusive content or discounts.

When writing an imperative sentence, keep the following tips in mind:

  1. Use strong verbs that convey a sense of urgency: buy, get, sign up, etc.
  2. Keep it short and to the point.
  3. Be clear about what you want the reader to do.
  4. Make sure the sentence is grammatically correct.
  5. Be aware of cultural differences regarding the use of imperatives. In some cultures, they are considered rude.

With these tips in mind, you’ll be able to write strong imperative sentences that get results.

The four main uses of Imperative sentences

The four main uses of imperative sentences are:

  1. To make a request, we can use imperative sentences with please. For example, “Please pass the salt.”
  2. To give a command, we can use imperative sentences without please. For example, “Pass the salt.”
  3. To make a suggestion, we can use imperative sentences with let’s. For example, “Let’s go for a walk.”
  4. To express an exclamation, we can use imperative sentences with exclamation marks. For example, “Watch out!”

As you can see, imperative sentences are very versatile and can be used in many different situations. So the next time you need to communicate something important, try using an imperative sentence.

Examples of Imperative sentences in everyday life

In daily life, we’re constantly bombarded with imperatives: commands, instructions, and requests that demand our attention and action. “Buy this now!” “Donate to our cause!” “Sign up for our newsletter!”

It’s no wonder that so many of us have become numbed to the imperative form. We see it so often that it has lost its impact. But when used sparingly and carefully, the imperative can be a powerful tool for getting people to take notice and take action.

Here are a few examples of how the imperative can be used effectively in everyday life:

  • “Thanks for calling customer service. Your call is important to us.”
  • “Please hold the line for the next available representative.”
  • “We’re sorry, but the line is currently busy. Please try your call again later.”
  • “You’ve reached the voicemail of John Smith. Please leave a message after the tone.”
  • “Thank you for your payment. Your transaction has been processed successfully.”
  • “We regret to inform you that your application has been denied.”

As you can see, the imperative is often used in customer service and other automated messages. But it can also be used in more personal interactions.

  • “Please knock before entering.”
  • “Can you please turn off your cell phone?”
  • “Would you mind closing the door?”
  • “I’m sorry, but could you speak up a bit? I can’t hear you very well.”

In these examples, the imperative is used to make a request. And while the tone is polite, it’s also direct and to the point.

So the next time you need to communicate something important, don’t be afraid to use the imperative form. Just be sure to use it sparingly and choose your words carefully. Otherwise, you run the risk of sounding like a broken record.

10 English imperative verbs with example sentences

If you want to write good English, imperative verbs are a must. Here are some example sentences:

  1. Do your homework.
  2. 2Brush your teeth.
  3. Take a bath.
  4. Get dressed.
  5. Eat breakfast.
  6. Go to school.
  7. Do the dishes.
  8. Feed the dog.
  9. Take out the trash.
  10. Go to bed early tonight!

Imperative verbs are verbs that tell people what to do, and they’re essential for clear, concise writing. Here are a few tips for using them effectively:

  • Use them sparingly. too many imperatives in a piece of writing can come across as bossy or confrontational. When in doubt, use a different verb tense or structure altogether.
  • Be clear and specific. Vague imperatives like “do your best” or “try harder” aren’t very helpful. If you’re going to tell someone to do something, be specific about what you want them to do.
  • Make sure the subject is clear. It’s easy to accidentally leave out the subject of an imperative sentence, especially when you’re writing quickly. Double-check your sentence to make sure the subject is included before you hit ‘send’.
  • Be aware of tone. Imperatives can come across as harsh or demanding, so use them carefully in email and other written communications. In general, it’s best to avoid them altogether in informal writing.

Following these tips will help you use imperative verbs effectively in your writing. With practice, you’ll be able to add them into your sentences without sounding bossy or confrontational.

Negative imperative sentences

A negative imperative sentence gives a command or instruction while using negative words such as “don’t,” “not,” or “never.” For example, the following sentence is a negative imperative: “Don’t forget to close the door when you leave.” Negative imperative sentences are often used to give orders, make requests, or give warnings. They can also be used to express prohibition or to make suggestions.

However, negative imperative sentences can also sound bossy or harsh if they are not used carefully. When using negative imperatives, it is important to consider your tone of voice and the context of the situation.

In some cases, it may be better to use a positive imperative sentence instead. For instance, you might say “Please remember to close the door when you leave” if you want to request more politely.

Here are some more examples of negative imperative sentences:

  • “Don’t make any noise.”
  • “Never talk to strangers.”
  • “Don’t run in the halls.”
  • “Not so loud, please.”
  • “Don’t worry, be happy.”
  • “Don’t worry, everything will be alright.”
  • “Don’t look back, keep moving forward.”
  • “Never give up, never surrender!”

As you can see, negative imperatives are often used to express prohibition or to give warnings. They can also be used to make suggestions. Just be careful not to use them too often or you may come across as bossy.

Commands vs requests: the difference

There’s a big difference between commands and requests, even though they might look the same at first glance. A command is an imperative sentence that demands action. It’s a direct order, with no room for negotiation or debate. In contrast, a request is more of a suggestion than a demand. It’s a polite way of asking someone to do something, without putting them under any pressure. Of course, there’s a spectrum between these two extremes, but understanding the distinction is still important. After all, if you’re trying to persuade someone to do something, it’s much more effective to request than to issue a command!

Conclusion

Imperative sentences are commands, often used to give someone instructions. They typically begin with a verb in the imperative mood, which shows that the sentence is a command. To form an effective Imperative sentence, be sure to use a clear and concise directive verb phrase. Avoid using words like please or thank you, as they can weaken the impact of your message. When giving someone an instruction, always be polite and respectful.

FAQs

What is an imperative sentence?

An imperative sentence is a type of sentence that gives a command or instruction. The most common type of imperative sentence is a command, such as “Sit down!” or “Come here!”.

What are the different types of imperative sentences?

There are two types of imperative sentences: commands and requests.

Commands are typically used when we want someone to do something. They can be either positive or negative, such as “Sit down!” or “Don’t stand up!”.

Requests are typically used when we want someone to give us something or do something for us. They are usually phrased as questions, such as “Can you please pass me the salt?” or “Would you mind closing the door?”.

How do I know if a sentence is an imperative sentence?

The easiest way to tell if a sentence is an imperative sentence is to look for the word “please”. If the sentence includes the word “please”, it is likely a request. If the sentence does not include the word “please”, it is likely a command.

What are some other words that can be used in imperative sentences?

In addition to “please”, there are a few other words that can be used in imperative sentences. These include:

  • Now – as in “Now sit down!”
  • Quickly – as in “Quickly, close the door!”
  • Slowly – as in “Slowly back away from the car.”
  • Carefully – as in “Carefully pour the milk into the bowl.”

What is the difference between an imperative sentence and a declarative sentence?

An imperative sentence is a type of sentence that gives a command or instruction. A declarative sentence is a type of sentence that makes a statement. The main difference between these two types of sentences is that imperative sentences always end with a exclamation point, while declarative sentences do not.

What is the difference between an imperative sentence and an interrogative sentence?

An imperative sentence is a type of sentence that gives a command or instruction. An interrogative sentence is a type of sentence that asks a question. The main difference between these two types of sentences is that imperative sentences always end with a exclamation point, while interrogative sentences end with a question mark.

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