Subordinating Conjunctions: Learn Them Easily

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Subordinating Conjunctions: Learn Them Easily are words that join two clauses, with the second clause being subordinate to the first. The subordinate clause cannot stand alone as a sentence. In other words, if you remove the subordinate conjunction from the sentence, you will be left with two incomplete thoughts.

There are many subordinating conjunctions in English, some of the most common ones include: after, although, as, as if, as long as, because, before, even though, if, in order that, once, provided that, rather than, since, so that, unless, until and when.

Subordinating Conjunctions: Learn Them Easily

What are Subordinating Conjunctions: Learn Them Easily and why do we need them?

As we have seen, subordinate clauses cannot stand alone as sentences. They need to be attached to the main clause to make sense. Subordinating conjunctions are the words that join these two clauses together.

In addition, subordinating conjunctions can be used to add detail or further information about the main clause. For example:

The subordinating conjunction ‘because’ can be used to explain why something happened:

  • I failed the test because I didn’t study enough.

The subordinating conjunction ‘when’ can be used to describe when something happened:

  • I’ll do the laundry when I have time.

The subordinating conjunction ‘if’ can be used to describe a condition:

  • I’ll go to the party if you come with me.

As you can see, subordinating conjunctions are important words that we use all the time in our writing. To use them correctly, we need to understand how they work.

How do subordinating conjunctions work?

When we use subordinate conjunction, we are joining two clauses together. The first clause is called the main clause and the second clause is called the subordinate clause. The subordinate clause cannot stand alone as a sentence without the main clause.

The subordinate conjunction usually comes at the beginning of the subordinate clause. For example:

  • Because I didn’t study enough, I failed the test.
  • When I have time, I’ll do the laundry.
  • If you come with me, I’ll go to the party.

In each of these examples, the subordinate conjunction (because, when, if) comes at the beginning of the subordinate clause. The subordinate clause is then followed by a comma. This is because the subordinate clause provides additional information about the main clause.

It’s important to remember that a comma is only used when the subordinate conjunction comes at the beginning of the subordinate clause.

How to identify subordinating conjunction in a sentence

Subordinating conjunctions can be tricky to spot because they don’t always appear at the beginning of the subordinate clause. For example:L

  • I failed the test because I didn’t study enough.

In this sentence, the subordinating conjunction ‘because’ appears at the beginning of the subordinate clause. However, this is not always the case.

Here are some more examples:

  • After I had studied for the test, I felt confident that I would pass.
  • Although I didn’t study enough, I still managed to pass the test.
  • I will go to the party if you come with me.
  • Unless you come with me, I’m not going to the party.
  • So that I can pass the test, I need to study more.

As you can see, there are many different subordinating conjunctions in English. In order to use them correctly, we need to understand how they work.

How to use subordinating conjunctions correctly

Now that we know what subordinating conjunctions are and how to identify them, let’s take a look at how to use them correctly.

When we use a subordinating conjunction, we are joining two clauses together. The main clause is the independent clause that can stand alone as a sentence. The subordinate clause is the dependent clause that cannot stand alone as a sentence.

Here is an example:

  • I passed the test because I studied enough.

In this sentence, the main clause is ‘I passed the test’ and the subordinate clause is ‘because I studied enough’. The main clause can stand alone as a complete sentence. However, the subordinate clause cannot stand alone without the main clause.

It is important to remember that subordinating conjunction must come before the subordinate clause. For example:

  • I passed the test because I studied enough.

NOT: I passed the test I studied enough because.

If you reverse the order of the clauses, it changes the meaning of the sentence. In the incorrect example above, it sounds like you only passed the test because you studied enough. However, in the correct sentence, it sounds like there are other reasons why you passed the test, but one of them is because you studied enough.

Here are some more examples:

  • After I had studied for the test, I felt confident that I would pass.

In this sentence, ‘after I had studied for the test’ is the subordinate clause and ‘I felt confident that I would pass’ is the main clause.

Even though I didn’t study enough, I still managed to pass the test.

In this sentence, ‘even though I didn’t study enough’ is the subordinate clause, and ‘I still managed to pass the test’ is the main clause.

So that I can pass the test, I need to study more.

In this sentence, ‘so that I can pass the test’ is the subordinate clause, and ‘I need to study more’ is the main clause.

As you can see, there are many different ways to use subordinating conjunctions. To use them correctly, you need to pay attention to the two clauses that they are joining together.

The different types of subordinating conjunctions

Now that we know what subordinating conjunctions are and how to use them, let’s take a look at the different types of subordinating conjunctions.

There are three main types of subordinating conjunctions: time, cause and effect, and condition.

Let’s take a closer look at each one.

Subordinating conjunctions of time

The first type of subordinating conjunction is the subordinate conjunction of time. As the name suggests, these conjunctions are used to join two clauses together when one event happens after the other.

Here are some examples:

  • After I had studied for the test, I felt confident that I would pass.
  • I will go to the party after I finish my homework.
  • Once I pass the test, I will be able to get my driver’s license.

As you can see, all of these sentences have two clauses: one that happens after the other. The subordinate conjunction of time is used to join these two clauses together.

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Subordinating conjunctions of cause and effect

The second type of subordinating conjunction is the subordinate conjunction of cause and effect. These conjunctions are used to join two clauses together when one event is the result of another event.

Here are some examples:

  • Because I didn’t study enough, I failed the test.
  • I failed the test because I didn’t study enough.
  • Since I didn’t study enough, I failed the test.
  • I failed the test since I didn’t study enough.

As you can see, all of these sentences have two clauses: one that is the result of the other. The subordinate conjunction of cause and effect is used to join these two clauses together.

Subordinating conjunctions of condition

The third type of subordinating conjunction is the subordinate conjunction of condition. These conjunctions are used to join two clauses together when one event is dependent on another event.

Here are some examples:

  • If I study enough, I will pass the test.
  • I will pass the test if I study enough.
  • Unless I study enough, I will fail the test.
  • I will fail the test unless I study enough.

As you can see, all of these sentences have two clauses: one that is dependent on the other. The subordinate conjunction of the condition is used to join these two clauses together.

Now that you know the different types of subordinating conjunctions, let’s take a look at some of the most common subordinating conjunctions.

Conclusion

In conclusion, subordinating conjunctions are a type of conjunction used to join two clauses together. There are three main types of subordinating conjunctions: time, cause and effect, and condition. Subordinating conjunctions are important because they can change the meaning of a sentence. Pay attention to the two clauses that the subordinating conjunction is joining together to use them correctly.

FAQ’s

Q: What is a subordinating conjunction?

A: A subordinating conjunction is a word that connects two clauses, with the dependent clause coming before the independent clause. This type of conjunction is also sometimes called subordinate conjunction.

Q: How many subordinating conjunctions are there in English?

A: There are many subordinating conjunctions in English. Here is a list of some of the most common ones:

after, although, as, as if, as long as, as soon as, because, before, even though, if, so that, once, since, so that, though, until, when, whenever, where, whereas, whether.

Q: What is the difference between coordinating conjunction and subordinating conjunction?

A: A coordinating conjunction joins two independent clauses, whereas subordinating conjunction joins a dependent clause to an independent clause.

Q: How do I use subordinating conjunction in a sentence?

A: The easiest way to use subordinating conjunction is to put it at the beginning of the dependent clause. For example:

  • I will go out with you tonight if you buy me dinner first.

In this sentence, “if you buy me dinner first” is the dependent clause, and “I will go out with you tonight” is the independent clause. The subordinating conjunction “if” connects the two clauses.

Another common way to use subordinating conjunction is to put it in between the two clauses. For example:

  • I will go out with you tonight provided that you buy me dinner first.

In this sentence, “provided that you buy me dinner first” is the dependent clause, and “I will go out with you tonight” is the independent clause. The subordinating conjunction “provided that” connects the two clauses.

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