Toward Or Towards? A Comprehensive Guide To Usage

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Are you confused about whether to use the word “toward” or “towards”? Do you find yourself wondering which version is correct in a sentence? If so, this guide is for you. Here, we will provide a comprehensive overview of when to use toward and towards correctly. We’ll discuss their definitions, examples of usage, grammar rules, common phrases with these words, regional differences in usage and idioms involving toward or towards. By the end of this article, you should have a good understanding of how to use both versions in your own writing.

Let’s get started!

Toward or Towards

Definition of Toward or Towards

“Toward” or “Towards” is a preposition indicating the direction of movement. It is often used interchangeably, but the latter is more commonly used in British English. This word signifies a movement or progression in a particular direction, whether it be physical or metaphorical. “Toward” can also imply an action that is in the process of being carried out or the intended destination of that action.

Although a seemingly simple word, “toward” or “towards” carries a significant impact on communication, particularly in providing clear instructions or intentions.

Examples of Toward or Towards in a Sentence

Toward and towards are two interchangeable prepositions that mean in the direction of. Both prepositions are widely used in English, and in most cases, they can be used interchangeably without affecting the meaning of the sentence. For instance, “I’m walking toward the store” and “I’m walking towards the store” convey the same meaning. However, some grammarians argue that toward expresses a sense of movement, while towards suggests a target destination.

Regardless of their nuances, both prepositions are functional and commonly used in various contexts. Here are more examples: “The dog ran toward his master,” “The car swerved towards the railing,” and “He leaned towards the beautiful painting.” In summary, both prepositions are versatile and can be used in different sentence structures to convey directional movements or destinations.

Grammatical Rules for Toward or Towards

Grammatical rules can be confusing, making it challenging for some people to choose the right words to use. One common confusion is the words toward and towards. While both of these words have the same meaning, they differ grammatically. Toward is a preposition, whereas towards is a prepositional phrase.

The use of toward is more common in American English, while the use of towards is more common in British English. Understanding these rules will help you choose the correct word to use in your writing or speaking. Remember that consistency is key, so once you choose one form, ensure that you use it throughout your writing.

When to Use Toward vs. Towards

When it comes to the words toward and towards, using one over the other may seem insignificant, but it could alter the tone of your sentence. While both words can be used interchangeably, some may argue that towards sounds more British, while toward sounds more American. However, this is not a hard and fast rule. In general, toward is used more commonly in American English, while towards is used more commonly in British English.

So, if you’re writing for an audience that favors British English, you may want to consider using towards to avoid confusion or alienation. However, if you’re writing for an American audience, it’s perfectly acceptable to use toward. Ultimately, it’s important Common Expressions with the Word Toward or Towards

Common expressions often include the words “toward” or “towards”. These words convey the

Other Uses of Toward or Towards

While “toward” and “towards” are commonly used to indicate direction, they also have other uses in English. For instance, “toward” can be used to suggest progress or movement in a particular direction. We might say, “The team is working toward a victory” to suggest they are making progress towards achieving their goal. “Towards,” on the other hand, is often used to indicate a relationship or attitude towards something or someone.

We might say, “She was sympathetic towards his situation” to suggest she had a positive attitude towards him. Knowing the multiple uses of these words can help you use them effectively in your writing and speech.

Conclusion

The words “toward” and “towards” can both be used interchangeably to indicate direction or orientation. However, it is important to note that toward is more commonly used in American English, while towards is more commonly used in British English. Additionally, these words can also be used to suggest progress or movement in a certain direction or to describe a relationship or attitude towards something or someone. With these tips for using toward and towards effectively, you should have no problem choosing the right word for your writing or speaking!

FAQs

Q: What is the difference between “toward” and “towards”?

A: The words “toward” and “towards” are both prepositions which signify movement in a particular direction. The difference is that toward is used more commonly in American English, while towards is popular in British English.

Q: When should I use “toward” or “towards”?

A: Generally speaking, if you are writing for an American audience you should use the word “toward,” and if you are writing for a British audience it would be better to use the word “towards.” However, if you are writing for a global audience, either word is acceptable.

Q: What are some common expressions with the word “toward” or “towards”?

A: Common expressions that use either of these words include “looking toward the future,” “working towards a goal,” and “leaning toward a decision.”

Q: Are there any regional differences in the usage of “toward” or “towards”?

A: Yes, as mentioned above, it is more common to see “toward” used in American English and “towards” used in British English. However, both versions are generally accepted in other regions as well.

Q: Are there any idioms involving the word “toward” or “towards”?

A: Yes, common idioms such as “bend over backward,” “cut corners,” and “turn a blind eye” all use either the word “toward” or “towards.”

Q: How can I remember which version to use?

A: To help you remember which version to use, think of it like this: American English uses TOWARD while British English uses TOWARDS. Additionally, you can keep in mind that the phrase “looking toward the future” is more common than “looking towards the future.”

Q: What is the conclusion on using toward and towards effectively?

A: The main takeaway from this article is that there is a slight difference between “toward” and “towards,” with the former being more popular among American English speakers and the latter more popular in British English. However, both versions are generally accepted in other regions as well. Additionally, there are several expressions and idioms with either word that you should be aware of. Finally, to help you remember which version to use, think of it like this: American English uses TOWARD while British English uses TOWARDS.

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