Subordinating Conjunctions—Learn Them Easily

subordinating conjunctions

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Subordinating conjunctions are one of the most important components of the English language. In a sentence, they connect two clauses that contain related ideas to form complex sentences. Subordinating conjunctions help express relationships between words, phrases and clauses in a way that is easy to understand.

What are Subordinating Conjunctions?

Subordinating conjunctions are an important part of the English language. They enable us to create complex and interesting sentences by introducing a subordinate clause.

  • Examples of subordinating conjunctions include: “although,” “after,” “before,” “if,” “so that,” and “when.”

One of the key distinguishing factors between a subordinating conjunction and other types of conjunctions is that the clause introduced by it cannot stand alone as a sentence. Put simply; subordinating conjunctions effectively create sentences with two parts – one which provides an independent clause and one which adds additional information in a dependent clause. Knowing how to correctly use incorporations such as these adds a layer of sophistication to any written communication.

subordinating conjunctions

Types of Subordinating Conjunctions

There are nine types of subordinating conjunctions: after, although, as if, because, before, since, so that, though and until. These can all be used for different reasons in various ways throughout a sentence or clause. For example:

  • After I finish my work I will go home
  • Although it was raining we still went out
  • As if he knew something he kept quiet
  • Because I wanted to try something new I decided to take a risk
  • Before the sun set we went for a walk
  • Since it was already late we didn’t stay out too long
  • So that everyone could understand me I spoke slowly
  • Though it was difficult we managed to finish in time
  • Until my boss arrived no one was sure what to do.

Learning the nine types of subordinating conjunctions and their use in sentences is an important part of mastering English as a second language. With practice, you can easily learn how to incorporate these words into your writing or speaking. By doing so, you’ll be able to express yourself more clearly and accurately convey your thoughts and ideas. So don’t hesitate—start practicing now!

Usage of Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions are an essential part of the English language, and can be used to form complex sentences with multiple ideas. Their use helps to bring clarity and structure to a sentence by connecting subordinate clauses, enabling us to accurately articulate our thoughts.

Common examples of subordinating conjunctions in English include phrases such as ‘even though’, ‘because’, and ‘since’. If used correctly, subordinating conjunctions can help writers craft a statement that conveys their intent more clearly. Learning when it is appropriate to use them and which language pairs together well can improve writing significantly. The usage of these conjunctions is important for any mastery of the English language.

Conclusion

Subordinating conjunctions are an important part of written English language. They enable us to create complex and interesting sentences by introducing a subordinate clause. Subordinating conjunctions help express relationships between words, phrases and clauses in a way that is easy to understand. There are nine types of subordinating conjunctions: after, although, as if, because, before, since, so that, though and until.

Their use helps to bring clarity and structure to a sentence by connecting subordinate clauses and can be used to form complex sentences with multiple ideas. Learning when it is appropriate to use them and which language pairs together well can greatly improve writing skills significantly. With the correct usage of these conjunctions anyone can easily master the English language.

FAQs

What are subordinating conjunctions?

Subordinating conjunctions are words that join a dependent clause to an independent clause. They express the relationship between the clauses and help to form complex sentences. Examples of subordinating conjunctions include ‘after’, ‘although’, ‘as’, ‘because’, etc.

What is the difference between coordinating and subordinating conjunctions?

The fundamental difference between them lies in how they connect two elements in a sentence. Coordinating conjunctions link two grammatically equivalent elements such as two nouns, two verbs, or two adjectives while subordinating conjunctions link an element with lesser importance (the dependent clause) to another element with greater importance (the independent clause).

What are the different types of subordinating conjunctions?

Subordinating conjunctions can be classified into several categories including time, place, cause and effect, comparison, concession and condition. Time clauses indicate when something happened or will happen while place clauses show where something happened. Cause and effect clauses state the cause of an event or reaction while comparison clauses compare two things. Concession clauses express surprise at a particular situation while condition clauses provide conditions for an event to occur.

How do we use subordinating conjunctions?

Subordinating conjunctions must always be followed by a dependent clause in a sentence whereas coordinating conjunctions can be used to join two independent clauses. For example, the sentence ‘I went to the store because I needed milk’ consists of an independent clause ‘I went to the store’ and a dependent clause ‘because I needed milk’. The subordinating conjunction in this sentence is ‘because’.

What are the benefits of learning subordinating conjunctions?

Learning subordinating conjunctions is important as they help to create complex sentences which make your writing more sophisticated. They also enable you to express relationships between ideas clearly and concisely. Furthermore, by using subordinating conjunctions correctly, you can easily avoid common grammar mistakes such as run-on sentences or sentence fragments. Thus, mastering subordinating conjunctions will not only improve your compositional skills but also enhance your overall command of the English language.

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