Simple Future Tense: Definition and Examples

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What do you need to know about the simple future tense? This verb tense is used to talk about what will happen in the future, and it’s easy to learn how to use it. Check out these examples and definitions, then learn how to form the simple future tense yourself. You’ll be able to use it in your writing with ease!

Simple Future Tense

What is Simple Future Tense?

The future tense is used to indicate that an action will take place at some point in the future. There are two common ways to form the future tense in English: using the auxiliary verb “will” or using the auxiliary verb “be,” followed by the present participle (e.g., I will write a book / I am going to write a book).

The choice of which auxiliary verb to use depends largely on the context and the level of formality. In general, “will” is more commonly used for spontaneous or predicted actions, while “be going to” is more commonly used for planned or pre-arranged actions.

For example:

  • I will meet you in front of the library at 3pm. (Spontaneous)
  • The sun will rise at 6am tomorrow. (Predicted)
  • I am going to study French this evening. (Planned)
  • We are going to have a party next weekend. (Pre-arranged)

However, there are many exceptions to this rule, so it is important to pay attention to how native speakers use these verbs in different contexts.

Formation of the Simple Future Tense

The simple future tense is used to describe an event that will happen at some point after the present moment. The formation of the simple future tense is relatively straightforward: the base form of the verb is used, followed by the suffix “-es” for third person singular subjects (he, she, it) or “-s” for all other subjects (I, you, we, they). For example, the simple future tense of the verb “walk” would be conjugated as follows:

  • I will walk
  • You will walk
  • He/she/it will walk
  • We will walk
  • They will walk

As you can see, there is no change in the verb for most subjects. The only exception is third person singular subjects, which require the addition of the “-es” suffix. When conjugating verbs in the simple future tense, it is important to remember this rule. Otherwise, you may end up with an incorrect sentence.

For example, if you were to say “he walks,” the meaning of the sentence would change completely. In this sentence, “walks” is in the present tense, which indicates that the subject is currently walking.

However, if you were to say “he will walk,” this would indicate that the subject will walk at some point in the future. As you can see, understanding how to form the simple future tense is essential for communicating correctly in English.

Usage of the Simple Future Tense

The Simple Future Tense is used to describe an action that will take place in the future. For example, “I will go to the store.” The verb “will” is used as the auxiliary verb, and it is followed by the base form of the main verb. The Simple Future Tense can also be used to make predictions, as in “The sun will rise at 6:00am.”

In this case, the verb “will” functions as a modal verb, indicating that the speaker believes that the sun rising at 6:00am is highly likely. The Simple Future Tense is a versatile tool that can be used in a variety of situations. With a little practice, you will be able to use it with confidence.

Positive Sentences in the Simple Future Tense

The simple future tense is used to describe an event that will happen at a later time. To form a positive sentence in the simple future tense, we use the base form of the verb. For example, if we wanted to describe what we will do tomorrow, we would say “I will walk the dog.”

The simple future tense is often used when making plans or predictions. For example, if you are planning to go on vacation next month, you might say “I will book a flight.” In addition, the simple future tense can be used to express confidence or certainty about something. For example, if you are sure that your team will win the game, you might say “We will win.”

The simple future tense is a versatile tool that can be used in a variety of situations. With a little practice, you will be using it like a native speaker in no time.

Negative Sentences in the Simple Future Tense

The future is always uncertain, which is why making predictions can be so difficult. However, certain grammatical constructions can help to convey a sense of certainty about the future. In English, negative sentences in the simple future tense are often used to express confidence about the outcome of an event.

For example, “I will not be late for the meeting” conveys a sense of certainty that the speaker will not be late. This construction is often used to make promises or to give reassurances. Of course, no one can truly know what the future holds. But by using negative sentences in the simple future tense, we can convey a sense of confidence and optimism about the chances for success.

Interrogative Sentences in the Simple Future Tense

We use interrogative sentences to ask questions. In English, there are four main types of question: general (or yes/no) questions, special questions, alternative questions, and tag questions. General (or yes/no) questions are the most basic type of question. We form them by simply adding the word “do” before the subject.

  • For example: “Do you like ice cream?”

Special questions are more specific, and we form them by using an interrogative word such as “what,” “where,” “when,” “why,” or “how.”

  • For example: “What will you do tomorrow?”

Alternatively, we can form special questions without using an interrogative word, but by changing the word order.

  • For example: “You will do what tomorrow?”

Tag questions are a type of question that we use to confirm something that we think is true. We form them by adding a mini-question at the end of a statement.

  • For example: “You’re going to the party tonight, aren’t you?”

To form a general question in the simple future tense, we need to use the auxiliary verb “will.” For example: Will you go to the party tonight? As you can see, the word order is different from a statement in the simple future tense. In a statement, we say: “You will go to the party tonight.” But in a question, we say: “Will you go to the party tonight?”

It’s important to remember this difference when forming questions in the simple future tense. Let’s look at some more examples:

  • Will it rain tomorrow? – Yes / No Questions
  • Will John meet us at the station? – Yes / No Questions
  • Will they finish the work today? – Yes / No Questions

As you can see from these examples, yes/no questions in the simple future tense are very easy to construct! Just remember to use the auxiliary verb “will” before the subject, and then ask your question as usual.

Contractions in the Simple Future Tense

In the English language, there are three main ways to indicate the future tense. One of these is the simple future tense, which uses the auxiliary verb “will” (or sometimes “shall”) followed by the base form of the verb. For example, the simple future tense of the verb “read” is “will read.” Another way to indicate the future tense is by using contractions.

In contractions, the auxiliary verb “will” is shortened to “ll,” and the base form of the verb remains unchanged. How shall we use contractions in the simple future tense? To form a contraction, simply take the auxiliary verb “will” and shorten it to “ll.” For example, the contraction for “will read” is “ll read.”

The base form of the verb remains unchanged. For example, the base form of the verb “read” is “read,” so the contraction for “will read” would be “ll read.” To indicate that a verb is in the simple future tense, you can use either the full form of the auxiliary verb (“will”) or the contraction (“ll”).

The following are some examples of sentences in the simple future tense:

  • I will read the book.
  • I’ll read the book.
  • You will read the book.
  • You’ll read the book.
  • He will read the book.
  • He’ll read the book.
  • She will read the book.
  • She’ll read the book.
  • It will read the book.
  • It’ll read the book.
  • We will read the book.
  • We’ll read the book.
  • They will read the book.
  • They’llread the book.
  • Will you read the book?
  • Shall I read the book?

As you can see, there are three main ways to indicate the simple future tense in English: by using the full form of the auxiliary verb “will,” by using the contraction “ll,” or by using the irregular form of the verb. You can use either the full form or the contraction, but keep in mind that the irregular form is only used in certain circumstances.

For example, the verb “read” has an irregular form in the simple future tense, so you would use “shall read” instead of “will read” if you were making a promise or setting a goal.

Now that you know how to use contractions in the simple future tense, try using them in your own writing. You may be surprised at how natural they sound!

Using the simple future tense verb ‘to be’

This verb “to be” can help you express your hopes and dreams for the future, as well as your fears.

  • For example, if you’re worried about what will happen when you retire, you can say “I will be retired.”
  • If you’re looking forward to a vacation, you can say “I will be on vacation.”
  • And if you’re hoping for a raise, you can say “I will be getting a raise.”

Knowing how to use the simple future tense verb “to be” can help you feel more confident about the future, no matter what happens.

Using the simple future tense verb ‘to have’

When you say ‘I will have a pizza for dinner tonight’, you’re using the simple future tense of the verb ‘to have’. This construction is used to describe future plans or intentions. It’s also used to make predictions about what will happen, based on present evidence. For example, if you see dark clouds gathering on the horizon, you might say ‘It’s going to have rain soon’.

Here are several examples using the simple future tense “to have”:

  • I will have a pizza for dinner tonight.
  • It’s going to have rain soon.
  • We will have arrived by six o’clock?
  • Will you have time to meet with me tomorrow?
  • They will not have forgotten our anniversary.
  • I’m sure she will have seen the error by now.
  • We’ll have gone through all the options by tomorrow.
  • By next year, they will have completed the construction project.
  • The company will not have tolerated his behavior for much longer.

The simple future tense is formed by using the base form of the verb ‘to have’ (will have) plus the past participle of the main verb. In the case of regular verbs, this is usually just the verb with -ed added to the end ( will have played, will have arrived). With irregular verbs, there are many different forms ( will have gone, will have seen, will have written).

The negative form is made by adding ‘not’ after ‘will’ ( will not have played). The interrogative form is made by switching the subject and ‘will’ around ( Will we have arrived by six o’clock?).

As you can see, the simple future tense is a very versatile construction that can be used in a variety of situations. So next time you need to describe a future event, make sure you use it!

Using the simple future tense verb ‘to do’

The future tense of the verb ‘to do’ is simple present tense. Many people use the word ‘will’ to talk about the future, but that isn’t always accurate. The future tense implies an action that hasn’t happened yet, but will happen at some point.

  • For example, if I say ‘I will go to the grocery store tomorrow,’ that means the action of going to the grocery store hasn’t happened yet (it’s in the future), but it’s something that I plan on doing.

Similarly, if I say ‘I am going to the grocery store tomorrow,’ that means the same thing – the action of going to the grocery store hasn’t happened yet, but it’s something that I’m planning on doing. So, when you’re talking about the future, using the simple present tense is more accurate than using ‘will.’

The Difference Between Will and Shall

People often get confused about the difference between “will” and “shall.” Here’s a simple rule of thumb:

If you’re talking about the future tense, use “will.”

  • For example, “I will go to the store tomorrow.”

If you’re talking about something that is mandatory or required, use “shall.”

  • For example, “You shall do your homework before you watch TV.”

Of course, there are always exceptions to the rule, but in general, this simple distinction will help you to use these words correctly.

Future Tense with Going to

There’s a simple future tense in English, and it’s really quite straightforward. When you want to talk about something that will happen in the future, you just add the word “will.” For example, “I will walk to the store.” It’s really that simple. But there’s another way to talk about the future in English, and that’s with the phrase “going to.”

  • For example, “I’m going to walk to the store.”

So what’s the difference between these two ways of talking about the future?

For one thing, the simple future tense is more often used for planned or scheduled events. For example, if you have a dentist appointment tomorrow, you might say “I will go to the dentist tomorrow.” On the other hand, if you’ve just decided that you’re going to walk to the store (perhaps because you don’t feel like taking the bus), you would probably say “I’m going to walk to the store.” In other words, “going to” implies that there’s some intention or decision involved, while the simple future tense can be used for either planned or unplanned events.

Another difference has to do with how certain we feel about something. The simple future tense is used when we’re pretty sure something will happen.

  • For example, if it’s already raining and you know that it will continue raining all day, you might say “It will rain all day.”

On the other hand, if you’re not sure whether it’s going to rain or not, you would probably say “It’s going to rain” (using the phrase “going to”). In other words, “going to” implies that we’re not entirely sure about something, while the simple future tense is used when we’re pretty confident that something will happen.

Present Continuous Tense as Future Tense

  • I’m going to be a better person.
  • I’m going to start my own business.
  • I’m going to get in shape.

These are all examples of the present continuous tense being used as future tense. The present continuous tense is created by using the present tense version of the verb “to be” (am, is, or are) plus the present participle of the main verb (the base form minus the “to”). In each of the examples above, the speaker is making a commitment to do something in the future. They are not just saying that they currently intend to do these things, but that they will actually do them.

The present continuous tense can be used for definite future plans, such as those above. However, it can also be used for more tentative plans or predictions. For example:

  • I think I’m going to get a promotion.
  • Are you going to join us for dinner tonight?
  • It’s starting to look like it’s going to rain.

In each of these cases, the speaker is not making a definite commitment to do something, but rather expressing a possibility or hypothesis. The present continuous tense is often used in this way with verbs such as think, believe, expect, and guess.

So next time you’re making plans for the future, remember that you can use the present continuous tense! It’s a great way to express both your certainty and your uncertainty about what’s to come.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the simple future tense is a verb tense that is used to talk about things that will happen in the future. There are many different ways to form the simple future tense, but they all typically involve some form of the word ‘will.’ The simplest way to use the simple future tense is just to add ‘will’ before the base form of the verb, as in ‘I will go to the store.’

However, there are other ways to express Simple Future Tense., such as using ‘be going to,’ which can emphasize intention or planning rather than simply talking about something that will happen. No matter which form you use, though, understanding and being able to utilize the Simple Future Tense is an important part of English grammar.

FAQs

What is the definition of the simple future tense?

The simple future tense is a verb tense used to express actions or states that will occur in the future. It is formed by using the base form of the verb + ‘will’.

What are some examples of how to use the simple future tense?

Some examples of how to use the simple future tense include making promises, expressing desires, and stating goals. For example: “I will pick you up at 7 PM tonight,” “I want to learn French in the future,” or “I promise I will call you tomorrow.”

What are some common mistakes made with the simple future tense?

One common mistake is to incorrectly use ‘going to’ instead of ‘will’. For example, saying “I am going to pick you up at 7 PM tonight” is incorrect. Another mistake is to use the present tense instead of the simple future. For example, saying “I call you tomorrow” is incorrect. The correct way to say this would be “I will call you tomorrow.”

When should I use the simple future tense?

The simple future tense can be used in a variety of situations where you need to express an action or state that will occur in the future. It is a versatile verb tense that can be used for making promises, expressing desires, or stating goals.

What are some other verb tenses that can be used to express actions or states in the future?

Other verb tenses can be used to express actions or states in the future, such as the present progressive tense, the future progressive tense, and the future perfect tense. However, the simple future tense is the most common verb tense used for expressing actions or states that will occur in the future.

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